Education Technology

NCTE: Homing in on Endings

Published on 07/19/2006

Activity Overview

Students learn ways to ensure a good ending to a story by considering the processes with which they revised the stories they chose and class discussion. This activity gives them a practical outlook on how to best end a story, speech, or statement.

Before the Activity

See the attached Activity PDF file for detailed instructions for this activity.

Print the appropriate pages from the Activity for your class.

Install the NoteFolio™ App on the students' graphing calculators following the attached instructions.

Students should have their devices and keyboards ready for typing. Instruct the class to open the file containing their revised endings to their selected stories.

During the Activity

  • Distribute the appropriate pages from the Activity to your class
  • Distribute the NoteFolio file(s) to your class using TI Connect™ and the appropriate TI Connectivity cable
  • Follow the procedures outlined in the Activity


  • Students will:
  • Read and view texts and performances from a wide range of authors, subjects, and genres.
  • Identify significant literary elements (including metaphor, symbolism, foreshadowing, dialect, rhyme, meter, irony, climax) and use those elements to interpret the work.
  • Evaluate literary merit based on an understanding of the genre and the literary elements.
  • Read and view texts and performances from a wide range of authors, subjects, and genres.
  • Identify significant literary elements (including metaphor, symbolism, foreshadowing, dialect, rhyme, meter, irony, climax) and use those elements to interpret the work.
  • Evaluate literary merit based on an understanding of the genre and the literary elements.
  • After the Activity

    In light of the discussion, generate a class discussion about the different short stories contained in the class textbook, and assess whether or not the endings are "good" or "bad." Use the logic mentioned by the students (and recorded on the board) to make the determination. If a story was "good" in spite of perhaps failing the logic of the rules determined by the students, explore why the story is "good" and adjust the rules accordingly, if needed.